Every Friday, The CSPH shares with you stories, reports, and headlines we’ve come across during the week focusing on sexuality, gender, sexual health, sexual politics, and more. These may be stories we found to be controversial, thought-provoking, or just plain interesting! Without further ado, here is the roundup for the week of June 14, 2013!

1. Grand Theft Dildos
Didn’t their parents teach them it’s rude to steal people’s toys?

2. Despite Images of Affluence, LGBT Poverty High
In real life, not everyone gets the luxury of being Callie Torres or Stanford Blatch.

3. Violence Against Women Is a Men’s Issue
A TED Talk asks real questions about violence and what we should be doing to stop it.

4. Excuse Me Ma’am, Your Son’s a Dick
Step 1: Document pig-ish sexual harassment. Step 2: Send it to the harasser’s mom.

5. Geek Gone Kink
Hacking games has never looked sexier.

6. Moves Like Piper
CSPH favorite Erica Moen does a super fun profile of a stripper, in comic form!

Job Listing: Program Assistant, Fenway Health Center

[We post job listings for relevant opportunities we think our audience might be interested in under the tag “Job Listings” - all of which can be accessed in the order they are posted by clicking JOB LISTINGS on our sidebar. Check back frequently for the latest updates, and please help disseminate! Also check out The Center for Sexual Pleasure and Health on LinkedIn.]

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Note: This is an excerpted job description. Click this link to read the whole thing.

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Organization Information: 

Fenway Health is a comprehensive community health center, providing a wide continuum of health care services. We are New England’s leading primary care health center for the lesbian and gay community, and in addition we provide health care to residents of Boston’s Fenway neighborhood.

Fenway also administers The Fenway Institute, the nation’s leading center for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender research and evaluation, training and education and policy and advocacy. The Fenway Institute conducts a wide range of studies on such topics as HIV risk reduction and prevention, drug treatment trials efficacy, substance abuse recovery and hepatitis transmission. The following position is available at the Institute within Fenway Health.

Job Description: 

The Program Assistant will provide office management, administrative assistance, and social media/website support to the National LGBT Health Education Center. The Center provides professional development programs, such as workshops, webinars, and online resources to community health centers and other health agencies to help them improve their capacity to provide cost-effective, inclusive services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.

Responsibilities Include:

  • Providing administrative support such as coordinating meetingspreparing minutes, answering and directing calls, assisting with travel plans, and documenting reimbursements
  • Maintaining a database of training contacts and activities; supporting the development of surveys and evaluation tools
  • Updating and monitoring online technologies such as website content and Facebook for the Education Center.


Required Qualifications: 

  • Bachelor’s degree
  • Minimum two years of office experience
  • Strong interest in LGBT health
  • Ability to handle multiple tasks and prioritize assigned duties
  • Ability to work independently and in small groups
  • Experience with Webex and with WordPress content management system is desirable
  • Experience working in an ethnically, culturally, and racially diverse environment preferred
  • Ability to work harmoniously with diverse groups of individuals required

How To Apply: When applying for this position, please reference the job title and job ID #346

Applicants are encouraged to download and complete our application form from our website www.fenwayhealth.org/jobs, and send it to Human Resources via Fax or US Mail:

Fax: 617-927-6251

US Mail: Fenway Health 1340 Boylston Street 9th Floor, Ansin Building Boston, MA 02215 Attention: Human Resources

Job Listing: Director of Programs, Pride Foundation

[We post job listings for relevant opportunities we think our audience might be interested in under the tag “Job Listings” - all of which can be accessed in the order they are posted by clicking JOB LISTINGS on our sidebar. Check back frequently for the latest updates, and please help disseminate! Also check out The Center for Sexual Pleasure and Health on LinkedIn.]

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Note: This is an excerpted job description. Click this link to read the whole thing.

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Organization Information: Pride Foundation is a donor-supported community foundation that inspires a culture of generosity by connecting and strengthening organizations, leaders, and students who are advancing equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people and their families in the Northwest.

Job Description: 

The Director of Programs will provide strategic vision and leadership for Pride Foundation’s programmatic efforts throughout the Northwest. The Director will oversee all aspects of grants and scholarships across five states as well as develop strategies for special initiatives. The ideal candidate would bring a creative and thoughtful approach to program development while maintaining an appreciation of Pride Foundation’s history, legacy, and commitment to social justice philanthropy.j

This position reports to the Executive Director. This position directly supervises the Grants Program Officer and the Educational Programs Officer as well as oversees program staff interns. This position will be housed in the Seattle office, but requires some travel throughout our five-state region (Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington). Pride Foundation has a $3 million operating budget with 17 full-time employees and several student interns. It is governed by a board of 22 volunteers.

Responsibilities Include:

  • Oversee all programs, policies, and practices related to grant-making to individuals (scholarships and fellowships) and organizations (grants, initiatives, and advocacy funds).
  • • Lead strategic planning and guide evaluation of: fellowship and scholarship programs, special initiatives, advocacy funds, sponsorships, and quick response grants.
  • • Partner with key staff and constituents to define and oversee implementation of new initiatives.
  • • Provide support and supervision for program officers and guide the creation and implementation of student program internship positions.
  • • Determine best practices for philanthropic and community engagement efforts as they relate to an LGBTQ community foundation.
  • • Retain relevant community profile through serving on committees, engaging in professional development, and attending community events.
  • • Cultivate and support a strong network of donors, volunteers, and community members and inform and educate on Pride Foundation’s community giving model and achievements.
  • • Serve as a member of Pride Foundation’s senior management team.
  • • Develop and monitor relevant program budget.
  • • Develop and maintain close working relationships with the philanthropic community, individual and corporate donors, sponsors, and community partners.


Required Qualifications: 

• Bachelor’s degree from accredited college or university.

• Minimum of five years of experience working in the field of philanthropy.

• Experience in managing people and budgets. Minimum three-five years staff supervision experience.

• Effective communicator; highly skilled in writing and speaking; the ability to communicate Pride Foundation’s mission and interests to a broad audience.

• Ability to manage complex project and staff management in a fast-paced environment.

• Experience working in LGBTQ communities.

• Ability to collaborate effectively and quickly gain the respect and support of various constituencies.

• Commitment to Pride Foundation’s mission and programs.

• Demonstrated commitment to social justice philanthropy and progressive social change.

• Knowledge of national best practices related to grant making and scholarships.

• A track record of stewarding individual donors, corporations, and foundations.

• Highly entrepreneurial; resourceful, and flexible, with the ability to anticipate and act on events and opportunities which advance Pride Foundation locally, regionally, and nationally.

How To Apply: To Apply

Send letter of interest, resume, and the names and phone numbers of three professional references to:

Kris Hermanns, Executive Director, at Kris@PrideFoundation.org

Please include “Director of Programs” in the subject line of your email.

The position is available immediately. All applications will be reviewed and acted upon as they are received. The position will be filled as soon as the appropriate candidate is found. It is therefore recommended that you submit your materials as promptly as possible. Only those applicants selected for an interview will receive a response.

No telephone calls please.

crunkfeministcollective:

Today is national coming out day so I called my girlfriend early this morning. “Hello? Are you okay?” she asked, sleep and worry mixed in her voice. “I’m gay,” I said. “Today is national coming out day and I thought you should know.” “Goodbye.” She hung up. She’s not a morning person. She also “came out” in her teens and I, a grown woman, am way behind. For me, coming out isn’t as scary as it probably was for her in the mid-nineties.

I’m grown. I already had a baby “out of wedlock“, so I’ve experienced the worst of the anger caused by middle class politics of respectability. I have good friends. I had queer community before I even knew what it was. I’m an academic at an institution that is at least queer friendly on paper so I’ve learned how to develop systems of belief that make room for my whole being. I have enough queer politics to believe that anyone who has a problem with the way that I identify is at least misinformed about the nature of “natural.” I believe most things are socially constructed. I believe gender isn’t a binary opposition. Nor is sex. I don’t believe gender and sex are the same things. I believe in sexual fluidity and openness. I believe that texts, even the ones we hold most dear, are signs and therefore open to infinite interpretations. So what does a person with a belief profile like mine do on a day like today?

I was going to use my rainbow umbrella but it didn’t rain.

I was going to hold hands with my girlfriend in public but I’m in a long distance relationship.

I was going to put an “Out and Proud” sticker on my car but I’m still paying for it.

I was going to write a post under my own name but I decided to create an alias especially for the family members who stalk me on this site even though they don’t understand half of what is posted here. Runtelldat.

So I’m thinking. In the Judith Butler since of the concept, coming out may really be “going in”– into a box constructed by those who are hyper-vigilant about protecting their heterosexuality, a category that is as unstable as its binary opposition. In this dialectic, gay is what straight isn’t. Gay is natural hair because straight is permed hair (no seriously. Many of you are reading this in big cities, but when I first brought my nappy head back to my hometown, I received knowing glances and women touched my thighs a lot in public. I thought they were cousins I’d forgotten until my brother told me I was being read as gay.). Gay is a pantsuit with brogans because straight is a skirt with heels. Gay is the avoidance of ridiculous shit like “strictly dickly” and other phrases that straight girls use to protect themselves from themselves. Straight is a system of binaries and gay is bending the line. So I don’t want to come out just to go into some other box that will also confine me.

No. This is gay in a box: “Help me. I’m in a box. Let me out of this box!”

In a non-Butlerian, family sense, coming out is also “going in”– to communities constructed for those who get thrown out. I know that I’m going to get thrown out. I may not get to kiss my nephews and nieces anymore, as siblings have previously told me they don’t want “that gay shit” around their kids. I may also be forced out of other communities, real and imagined. I know there are some “back-home” friendships that will sadly end. There is a person whose hand I held as her father took his last, rattling breaths. When my “coming out” reaches her, I wonder if she’ll think that while I witnessed death up close for the first time, I was actually pushing back feelings of lust for her. I wasn’t. There are places I haven’t even been that will throw me out, places far less liberal than this relatively utopian community in which I live. Especially if I stay in the South. Queer folks stay getting whipped by the Bible Belt.

Painting of queer women in rainbow colors.

This is a utopian queer community. No “isms” in this painting.

My friend also reminded me that in the black vernacular sense, coming out is also “going in.” I started this journey with a theory: sexuality is ultimately fluid (which reminds me, I need to rewrite this), and many of the behaviors that we think are natural are actually learned. I then practiced this theory by kissing a girl who smelled like fabric softener and that was the end of my heterosexuality. It was easy to give up. Why? Because it didn’t really exist in the first place. Because sexuality exists on a continuum. Because we hold onto constructs that we think will save us until our fingertips bleed, and only when we slip do we realize that the abyss (in this case, whatever exists in excess of compulsory heterosexuality) is only two feet away. And its fun down there. And that was a pun. And that, gentle reader, is going in. Which is one of the things that I get to do (in the spirit of the Lorde) when I come out.

Audre Lorde speaking.

This is Sister Audre GOIN IN!

So I return to the notion of coming out and what it means for a grown woman academic who usually feels buttressed by the discourse in which she has chosen to reside. I wonder if coming out is for teenagers in search of community and protection from a system that denies children the right to be and find themselves. Is coming out just for married men who want to scare the world via Oprah? Is coming out for those whose celebrity will help secure rights and privileges for queer common folk like myself?

I think I’d rather just skip that part and go in, like Wayne sans misogyny. What do you think?


Another incredibly interesting perspective on “coming out”, or alternatively, “going in”. We’re trying to bring you a wealth of different views, opinions, and pieces this Coming Out Day!

(via dopegirlfresh)

when we as queer folks shout COME OUT! COME OUT! we must be sure that we as a community are prepared not just pay lip service to welcoming those youth into our “family” we must truly be prepared to open our homes, wallets, ears and hearts to ensure that the youth who pay a heavy price for heeding our call are not abandoned by the very community they have lost everything to be part of.

Sassafras Lowrey

(Please consider reading the whole post, it’s such an important perspective on National Coming Out Day.)

We older queers need to stop abandoning the generations to come. There is always a new generation, and we are always bitter toward them. In some aspects, these youth may have fewer struggles than we did, just as we have fewer struggles than the generations of queers who preceded ours (who were also a bit bitter toward us), and it makes it easier for more and more kids to come out, and at a younger age than we were able, at a much younger age than earlier generations were able. And that makes it easier for us to say “you’re being trendy” or “this is not real for you”. And that needs to stop. We’re over here talking about creating safe spaces and sometimes we need to think about being the safe space for these youth who have little to nothing to turn to.

(via tender-queer)

(via getouttaqueer)

HAPPY COMING OUT DAY!
And as we celebrate and revel in the bravery of those who have and are coming out every day, keep these words (by Alexis Elizabeth Kalinin) in mind:
"If you cannot come out today because of whatever reason — because you’re not ready, because you’re just too terrified, because you’re not sure what you’d even come out as, because you’re hanging on in a place that would become unsafe, or even deadly if you did — and you feel shame over this, then you mustn’t. You really mustn’t.I can’t tell you what to feel, and I can’t make you feel any differently from how you do, but please believe me there is no shame in that. I am thinking of you with love and affection. Yes, it takes lots of courage to come out, but staying closeted has nothing to do with cowardice. Please, do what is right to take care of yourself and if you need a friend, I’m here, as are others.”
We send our love to all queers today! <3

HAPPY COMING OUT DAY!

And as we celebrate and revel in the bravery of those who have and are coming out every day, keep these words (by Alexis Elizabeth Kalinin) in mind:

"If you cannot come out today because of whatever reason — because you’re not ready, because you’re just too terrified, because you’re not sure what you’d even come out as, because you’re hanging on in a place that would become unsafe, or even deadly if you did — and you feel shame over this, then you mustn’t. You really mustn’t.

I can’t tell you what to feel, and I can’t make you feel any differently from how you do, but please believe me there is no shame in that. I am thinking of you with love and affection. Yes, it takes lots of courage to come out, but staying closeted has nothing to do with cowardice. Please, do what is right to take care of yourself and if you need a friend, I’m here, as are others.”

We send our love to all queers today! <3

Job Listing: Programs Manager, Fenway Health

[We post job listings for relevant opportunities we think our audience might be interested in under the tag “Job Listings” - all of which can be accessed in the order they are posted by clicking JOB LISTINGS on our sidebar. Check back frequently for the latest updates, and please help disseminate! Also check out The Center for Sexual Pleasure and Health on LinkedIn.]

—————

Note: This is an excerpted job description. Click this link to read the whole thing.

—————

Organization Information: Fenway Health is a comprehensive community health center, providing a wide continuum of health care services. We are New England’s leading primary care health center for the lesbian and gay community, and in addition we provide health care to residents of Boston’s Fenway neighborhood.

Fenway also administers The Fenway Institute, the nation’s leading center for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender research and evaluation, training and education and policy and advocacy. The Fenway Institute conducts a wide range of studies on such topics as HIV risk reduction and prevention, drug treatment trials efficacy, substance abuse recovery and hepatitis transmission. The following position is available at the Institute within Fenway Health

Job Description: 

The Programs Manager oversees the timely completion of multiple training and technical assistance programs for the National LGBT Health Education Center. The Center provides professional development programs, such as workshops, webinars, and on-line resources to community health centers and other health agencies to help them improve their capacity to provide services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people. 

Responsibilities Include:

  • Managing the implementation and marketing of educational programs, including a webinar series, and working with faculty, webinar service providers, and continuing education accreditors to meet programmatic goals
  • Consulting with health care organizations to improve their systems of care
  • Managing relationships with partner organizations to accomplish educational projects
  • Writing and editing grant proposals and reports.
  • Developing health care organization assessment tools
  • Writing website and newsletter content
  • Managing support staff in tasks related to programs
    Required Qualifications: 

• Graduate degree in related field required

• Minimum three years’ work experience in related field

• Demonstrated excellence in written and verbal communication skills

• Experience working in an ethnically, culturally, and racially diverse environment preferred

How To Apply: When applying for this position, please reference the job title and job ID #325

If you have additional questions, please contact our Human Resources Office at (617) 927-6407. A detailed cover letter and resume may be e-mailed to employment@fenwayhealth.org; faxed to (617) 927-6251; or mailed to: Fenway Health, 1340 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02215, Attention: Human Resources

queerhairyvag:

nezua:

why do we have to be good all of a sudden?

this ^^
that’s the problem I have with a lot of communities- (black, lgbt, etc.)
so obsessed with ensuring the wider public that we’re all sisters and brothers and good that when someone doesnt behave how they are ‘expected’ to by their community (forgetting that though we have similar likeness, we are humans with different complex identities that cannot be determined by one characteristic) it’s like they are almost ‘betraying’ said community

Bolded emphasis ours.
So much of the rhetoric around LGBTQ inclusion tends to revolve around the fact that queer people are &#8220;just like straight people&#8221;: healthy, happy, and good family members, parents, and/or members of society. Which is obviously true; a gay person isn&#8217;t inherently any more likely to be an awful individual than a straight person is. 
But being &#8220;just like everyone else&#8221; means you have the potential - and the freedom - to be &#8220;bad&#8221; as much as to be &#8220;good&#8221;. When queer people &#8220;act out&#8221;, their activities/actions tend to be criticized through the lens of their queerness in a way that straight &#8220;bad guys&#8221; are never questioned: Was it because they were queer? What does this say about all the other queers? Does the queer movement stand up for this person as they do all the &#8220;good&#8221; ones?
Flawed or saintly, or somewhere in between (as most of us are), you are allowed to be who you are; the queer community is also a human community.
(not to mention that &#8220;bad&#8221; and &#8220;good&#8221; behaviors are often themselves social constructions&#8230;but that&#8217;s a post all to itself :P)

queerhairyvag:

nezua:

why do we have to be good all of a sudden?

this ^^

that’s the problem I have with a lot of communities- (black, lgbt, etc.)

so obsessed with ensuring the wider public that we’re all sisters and brothers and good that when someone doesnt behave how they are ‘expected’ to by their community (forgetting that though we have similar likeness, we are humans with different complex identities that cannot be determined by one characteristic) it’s like they are almost ‘betraying’ said community

Bolded emphasis ours.

So much of the rhetoric around LGBTQ inclusion tends to revolve around the fact that queer people are “just like straight people”: healthy, happy, and good family members, parents, and/or members of society. Which is obviously true; a gay person isn’t inherently any more likely to be an awful individual than a straight person is. 

But being “just like everyone else” means you have the potential - and the freedom - to be “bad” as much as to be “good”. When queer people “act out”, their activities/actions tend to be criticized through the lens of their queerness in a way that straight “bad guys” are never questioned: Was it because they were queer? What does this say about all the other queers? Does the queer movement stand up for this person as they do all the “good” ones?

Flawed or saintly, or somewhere in between (as most of us are), you are allowed to be who you are; the queer community is also a human community.

(not to mention that “bad” and “good” behaviors are often themselves social constructions…but that’s a post all to itself :P)

(via hairy-stargate-lesbian-deactiva)

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